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Bio

Page history last edited by Judi Moreillon 3 years, 8 months ago

I am a literacies and libraries consultant
and a staunch advocate for the leader and instructional partner roles of school librarians.

 

Currently, I serve as the chair of AASL's Innovative Approaches to Literacy Task Force,
as an AASL member on the AASL/ALSC/YALSA Interdivisional School-Public Library Cooperation Committee,
and as a mentor for the Lilead Project. 

 

I served for thirteen years as a coteaching school librarian at all three instructional levels and taught graduate students in library science for twenty-one years, most recently as an associate professor at Texas Woman’s University. 

 

I earned both an M.L.S. in library science and a Ph.D. in education at the University of Arizona. I have published more than 80 practitioner- and research-based articles in Knowledge Quest, School Library Connection, School Library Monthly, School Library Research, School Libraries Worldwide, Teacher Librarian, and more. To date, I have published three professional books for school librarians and classroom teachers and three books for children and families. 

 

I joined ALA and AASL as a graduate student in library science. I earned a first-time attendee scholarship and participated in my first ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco in 1997. I heard Karen Cushman give her unforgettable Newbery Medal Speech for The Midwife's Apprentice. On the exhibit floor, I met the incredibly gifted illustrator Ed Young, who joined me for lunch in Tucson later that summer.

 

I was hooked!

 

Over the course of my nearly three-decade involvement with our national association and its divisions, I have served in many capacities and reaped many benefits. These are just a few of the highlights.

  • Serving as an elementary school librarian during the exciting years of the National Library Power Project set my course as a coteaching educator committed to building effective classroom-library instructional partnerships (1993-1997).

  • I had the amazing opportunity to serve on AASL's @your library® Committee from 2002-2004. Through this experience, I developed an understanding of advocacy and made lifelong librarian colleagues and friends across the country.

  • In 2008-2009, I served as the chair of the AASL School Librarian's Role in Reading Task Force. We created a toolkit and drafted the Position Statement on the School Librarian's Role in Reading that was adopted by the AASL Board and was included in Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Programs (2009).

  • I served on the 2009-2010 Pura Belpré Book Award Committee, a year when our committee had only 36 titles to consider. This experience solidified my commitment to diversity in library collections and in advocating for increasing diversity in children's and young adult literature publishing.

  • Throughout my career, I've had many opportunities to collaborate with outstanding public library children's and teen librarians. I am pleased to be a current member of the Interdivisional School-Public Library Cooperation Committee. Representatives from AASL, ALSC, and YALSA serve on the committee. We have collaborated to create the Public Library and School Library Collaboration Toolkit that demonstrates and supports successful partnerships among librarians who serve young people. 

 

For a complete list of my service to our profession, see the AASL ballot.

 

You can access more information about me at:

 

StoryTrail: Building Connections for Learning and Advocacy

 

School Librarian Leadership Blog

 

Presentation Archive

 

Twitter Handle: @CactusWoman

(I tweet with #schoollibrarianleadership and #buildingconnections4learning.)

 

 

 

 

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